Sathyamangalam to Bangalore

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Service
Coach
Departure
Arrival
Availablity
Fare
CBE TO BLR Non A/C 47 Vega
2+1, Sleeper/Seater,Non-AC, Video (47 seats)
11:35 PM
05:25 Hrs
05:00 AM
33
Seats available
CBE To BLR -AC (30)
2+1, Sleeper,AC (30 seats)
11:30 PM
05:30 Hrs
05:00 AM
24
Seats available

About Sathyamangalam

Book online bus tickets to Sathyamangalam By SPS Travels India

Sathyamangalam or Satyamangalam or Sathy is a city and a municipality in Erode district in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. It lies on both north and south banks of the Bhavani River, a tributary of the Kaveri. Sathyamangalam forms a taluk (subdistrict) of Erode District. Sathyamangalam was formerly part of Coimbatore District, but became part of Erode District when the district was constituted in 1979.

The temple of Bannari Amman (a Hindu deity) is located in Bannari,12 km from Sathyamangalam town. The temple draws huge crowds during the annual festival and through out the year.

Sathyamangalam town is situated on the southern side of Western ghats which extends towards the east from The Nilgiris. The town is located at 11 degree 14 minutes East longitude. It is located at a distance of 7 km, from the ghats in Sathyamangalam Taluk of Erode district. The town lies close to the border of the adjoining Karnataka State. The nearby Bhavanisagar Dam, a picnic spot and Bannari Mariamman Temple, a Pilgrim Centre, both attract people and tourists all the year round. There is also a heavy movement of people to Karnatake State, especially to Mysore and Kollegal through this town. You can visit this kind of places with SPS Travels India and the town is situated at a distance of 65 kms.from Erode. The Head Quarters of Erode District is linked with State Highways (SH 15) .The Coimbatore Mysore National Highways ( NH 209) passes through this town. The nearest Railway Station is Mettupalayam in Coimbatore District, at a distance of 43 Km. The Erode Railway Junction is serving as an out agency for Sathyamangalam. The town is also linked with Gobichettipalayam, Bhavani Sagar, Mettupalayam and Bhavani Town with District roads, and links the towns of Samraj Nagar and Mysore in neighbouring Karnataka State, through National Highway Roads. The nearest Airport is located at Coimbatore, 68 kms, away.

A portion of the sathyamangalam forests was declared as sanctuary in 2008. Sathyamangalam is also the name of a Reserve Forest under the Wildlife Protection Act, 1973. It is contiguous with the Biligirirangan Temple Wildlife Sanctuary to the north in neighbouring Chamarajanagar District of Karnataka, and together forms a vital corridor for faunal movements, mainly elephants. The Sathyamangalam forest is tropical dry forest, part of the South Deccan Plateau dry deciduous forests ecoregion. It includes thorn forest, dry deciduous forest, and tropical hill forest. Many of the higher elevations of the Bilgirirangan range have shola, or dwarf moist deciduous forest, and montane grassland habitats. These forests also harbour indigenous tribal people belonging largely to the Irula (also known as the Urali) and, Soliga communities. Southwards, the heights decrease into the arid Coimbatore plains before rising again into the Nilgiris and Anamalais. The forests are home to Asian Elephants, and the herd that ranges between the Western Ghats and Eastern Ghats through the Sathyamangalam forests numbers 6000 animals, the largest herd in India. Elephant movements in this corridor were the subject of one of the first studies on the Asian Elephant by the Indian elephant scientist R. Sukumar in early 1980s. The Sathyamangalam elephants were also the subject of Indian elephant expert Vivek Menon's book Tusker — The Story of the Asian Elephant.

The forests were also the home of the legendary Indian bandit Koose Muniswamy Veerapan, who made a living exploiting ivory and sandalwood from the forests and selling them on the black market. Veerapan was killed by police in October 2004. After Veerapan was killed, people reported paranormal activities occurring in the forest such as screaming in the middle of the night and unattended lanterns seen deep in the forest. The forest of Sathyamangalam is also known for its ghost sightings and is referred to "The most haunted place in Tamil Nadu".

A major National highway NH 209 connecting Erode & Coimbatore to Mysore via Sathyamangalam passes through the forests. This route is best for vehicles from Coimbatore, Erode bound for Bangalore as it has lesser traffic when compared to NH 47 (via Salem). But one must be sure about the driving skills required for a hilly terrain because it has got 27 hairpin bends and some of which are really dangerous.

You can easily book the online bus tickets through SPS Travels India

About Bangalore

The city of Bangalore is India’s third largest city and the state capital of Karnataka, known for being a modern, cosmopolitan metropolis at the helm of the country’s IT-boom. Bangalore is a shopper’s haven overrun with big malls and shopping districts, as well as a food lover’s paradise with one of the highest concentrations of places to eat in the continent. Spotted with parks and natural lakes, Bangalore is alternately known as ‘The Garden City of India.’ Recently voted as the most livable metro in the country, Bangalore is known as‘Pensioner’s Paradise’ on the one hand and as ‘Start-up City,’ on the other, attracting youth from across the world with its trending markets and rapid availability of jobs. With Bangalore’s ever-doubling IT infrastructure, it is often referred to as the Silicon Valley of India.

Another aspect of Bangalore is soaked in the history of bygone, ancient cultures. Bangalore has been peopled for up to 3000 years, bearing megalithic monuments that treasure its rich past. Bangalore, as we know it today, was established in 1537 by KempeGowda I, who constructed a well-planned city within an oval mud fort in the area that is today known as City Market. Gradually, Bangalore grew into a commercial center and a chief part of the silk industry. Over successive centuries the Marathas, Mughals, Wodeyars and the Mysore Sultanate, all did their bit to develop the city further. In 1809 the British set up a cantonment in Bangalore, drawn by its pleasant weather and central location.

The earliest recorded usage of the name Bengaluru is found in today’s ‘Old Bangalore,’ in a 9th century temple. According to legend, King ViraBallala was once lost in the jungles that once overran these parts. He was wandering, tired and hungry, when an old woman revived him with her hospitality and a plate of boiled beans. Out of gratitude the King consequently named the area ‘Benda KaaluUru’ (Town of Boiled Beans). It was only in 1831, when the British seized Mysore from the ruling Wodeyars that the capital was shifted to Bangalore. The anglicization of Bengaluru turned it into Bangalore until it was recently reverted back to its original.

Although Bangalore is not a popular tourist destination, there are many sites worth taking a tour of. The legislative House of Karnataka, VidhanaSoudha, is one of the Chief attractions of Bangalore. It was built during the 1950s using granite in a neo-Dravidian style of architecture. Other places of historical interest include the Bangalore Palace, constructed by the Mysore Maharajahs and Tipu Sultan’s Palace, built around 1790 as Tipu’s summer retreat.

A tour of Bangalore must also include Lalbagh Botanical Gardens- built by Hyder Ali in 1760, and the Bannerghatta National Park- a 25,000-acre zoological park one and a half hours away from Bangalore City. Educational tours of Bangalore may include the Vishweshwaraiah Industrial and Technological Museum, the State Archaeological Museum, the Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium, the Venkatappa Art Gallery and the Karnataka ChitrakalaParishad. Religious tours of Bangalore cover the Bull Temple in Basavanagudi, the Maha Bodhi Society Temple- a replica of the Bodh Gaya Stupa, the ISCKON temple, the Maruthi Temple, the GaviGangadeshwara Cave Temple as well as many other temples, mosques and churches of historic significance.

Due to an average elevation of 920 meters above the sea level, Bangalore enjoys a cool climate throughout the year. Although summers can get hot with dry heat waves, it seldom exceeds 35 degrees Celsius and hovers around a mean temperature of 24 degrees Celsius.